CHECKLIST

Clothing

  • 2 swimsuits – Since you spend the majority of your time in your swimsuit, it’s a good idea to bring
    two so you can let one dry while you wear the other.
  • 2 towels – The same rules apply for towels because nothing is worse than drying off with a wet
    towel. Perhaps make one a pack towel. One for salt, one for fresh.
  • 2 dresses – A few cotton dresses can be thrown on over your swimsuit in a pinch.
    Guys can substitute shorts and shirts here.
  • 1 pair of ankle socks – Fins can rub on your heels so a pair of socks makes them more
    comfortable.
  • 2 pairs of underwear – If you don’t want to sleep in your swimsuit, pack a few pairs of undies or
    jammies since this is dormitory style, you’ll need something to sleep in besides your birthday suit!
  • Sarong –cover up
  • Shoes- you end up barefoot most of the time but the no skid can rub tender feet after a week. Flip
    flops or Teva like sandals for shore excursions are recommended.
  • Rain jacket – It can be wet on deck from rain or spray from waves.

Toiletries

  • Leave in conditioner – Hair gets to be a tangled mess and some leave in conditioner is helpful.
  • Deodorant – It gets hot on the sundeck and you don’t want to smell.
  • Hair ties – If you have long hair you can pull it back so it doesn’t get caught in your mask.
  • Toothbrush and toothpaste – Keep that smile white, even in the middle of the ocean.
  • Hairbrush or comb – It may be hard to run a brush through your hair, but it’s always good to have.
  • Lotion – Salt water dries out skin.
  • Birth control – You never know when you might meet a sexy scuba diver.
  • Eye drops – If your eyes are sensitive to salt water, eye drops can flush them out.
  • Contacts/glasses – For those of us who wear contacts, bring extras in case yours fall out. If you
    wear glasses, you can rent prescription masks from the local dive shop.
  • Sleeping pills – If the diving doesn’t wear you out, you may find it difficult to fall asleep because of
    the people who want to stay up late and the constant rocking of the ship. Gravol can help for both
    sea sickness and sleeping.
  • Protection from the Elements
  • Hat – Ideally one that covers the ears.
  • Motion sickness tablets – The motion of the ocean can make you queasy.
  • Sunscreen – SPF 30 minimum, even if you will be in the ocean the majority of the day you can still
    get burned.
  • Sunglasses – One pair should be sufficient.

Technology

  • iPod – Good for down time and parties at night with fellow divers.

Gear

  • Dive log – To keep track of your dives. Money for port night and tip for crew. Thursday, we are back in port and most folks go out. We
    still provide dinner and drinks on board. Tip for crew can be paid in cash or by credit card.
  • Dive certification card: If you’re going on your open water course, they will give you a card.
  • Dive gear – personal gear required:  mask, fins, and snorkel.  If you don’t have your own SCUBA gear, we have a rental line that includes buoyancy compensator, wetsuit, dive computer, regulator set and dive light.  

Other

  • Money for port night and tip for crew. Thursday, we are back in port and most folks go out. We
    still provide dinner and drinks on board. Tip for crew can be paid in cash or by credit card.
  • Snacks – If you get hungry in between meals you can bring little snacks on board. Special diets can
    be accommodated with prior arrangements.
  • Book – A paperback book is good to have for afternoons between dives and you can swap it with
    other divers when you’re done
  • Eye mask – Block out the light so you can fall asleep.
  • Ear plugs – Helps motion sickness and drowns out boat noise.
  • Journal – Write down daily thoughts and contact information for new friends.
    – Clothespins – Keep your clothes from being blown from the clothesline into the ocean.
    – Deck of cards – Always a good idea.

What NOT to bring

  • Big bulky bags – try to pack light and in soft sided bags. You can leave your wheeled bags at the
    dock storage with your going home clothes.
  • Alarm clock – you are on vacation!
  • Makeup – There’s no point in applying mascara once you dive into the ocean. Leave it in your go
    home bag at the dock!
  • Gear kept in storage compartment on the boat deck: boots, fins, mask, snorkel, BCD, octopus,
    wetsuit, hood, gloves, dive skin, towel, weight belt, rash guard, mask defog, dive knife, dive lights,
    tank banger, hat, sun glasses, spray conditioner, comb, sunscreen and zinc, 8-10 plastic clamps for
    hanging wet items on the side of the boat to dry, dive log and pen, dive tables, dive computer, and
    a super absorbent towel you can wring out over and over like the Shamwow or the Absorber.
    Cotton towels will rarely dry out on deck when you are diving 3-5 times a day. Other backup stuff,
    like duct tape, extra fin and mask straps, o-rings and so on.
  • Gear for your bunk storage: I’d bring two fast drying towels – I like Sea to Summit DryLite Towel
    because they are thin, soft and fast drying. Rain jacket and pants, multiple swim suits, T-shirts,
    shorts, underwear, stuff you sleep in, couple pairs of socks, wind breaker, fleece jacket, tevas or
    shoes, flip flops, shampoo, body wash, 5 gallon ziplock bags, comb, floss, toothbrush, toothpaste,
    ear plugs (you might need them), water bottle, Wet Ones hand wipes, Freshbath body wipes, eye
    glasses, saline solution, medications, pain killers (you might get sore from lots of diving), lip balm,
    camp suds, alarm clock, facial tissues, 4-6 giant binder clips, head lamp, reading material,
    extension cord, camera, battery charger for camera, small portable fan (for summer), mp3 player
    and charger, hand lotion, passport, money, motion sickness medications.
  • Backup equipment: The boat has backup equipment in case yours fails or you forget to bring
    something. I lost my dive belt on one trip, and they had extras basic equipment ready to use. On
    the latest trip my dive computer battery failed prematurely. They gave me a backup computer to
    use. It was most certainly the most basic equipment I wouldn’t buy, but it was better than
    nothing. They did not have lots of backup wetsuits, so be sure to bring your own. If you rent
    from them, better try on the suit before you leave the dock and that it is adequate in terms of
    coverage. My dive buddy got a shortie loaner for the trip. It was much too big for her, not giving
    her enough thermal protection.
  • Gear left at the dock: suitcases, clothes and toiletries for the return trip home, street shoes and
    everything else you won’t need on the boat. For this trip, less is more!